My neighbourhood

When we’re not travelling, our permanent base is a townhouse in North Plano, a suburb north of downtown Dallas. It is a nice, quiet place, with a commercial area within walking distance. Having shops, pubs and restaurants within walking distance is a boon in suburban Dallas, where you cannot survive without a car.

Come with me on a walk to The Shops at Legacy, where we shop, eat, drink and catch a movie.

Let's go
Let’s go
Communal mail bank
Communal mail bank
It's all apartments when we cross the road
It’s all apartments when we cross the road
Pretty square with cowboy and longhorns sculptures
Pretty square with cowboy and longhorns sculptures
Welcome to The Shops
Welcome to The Shops
Boutiques share space with restaurants and bars
Boutiques share space with restaurants and bars
The Angelika, where we can watch art-house and  foreign films, very rarely found in Dallas.
The Angelika, where we can watch art-house and foreign films, very rarely found in Dallas.
The lake at the end is very popular for photoshoots
The lake at the end is very popular for photo shoots
A view of Bishop Street
A view of Bishop Street
No a pit stop at our favourite pub
No a pit stop at our favourite pub

 

What do you like about your neighbourhood?

Ride the historic M-Line trolley in Dallas

Are you in Dallas and at a loss what to do next?

You have already been to the 6th Floor Museum and stood on the Grassy Knoll looking towards the spot where JFK was shot. You have been to as many steakhouses and eaten as much BBQ as you possibly can. You have hit swanky bars on McKinney Avenue. You have shopped till you dropped.

Now it’s the time to ride the vintage M-Line trolley.

The Green Dragon lumbering down McKinney Avenue
The Green Dragon lumbering down McKinney Avenue

Head to the Arts District, allegedly the biggest in the country, and wait at the St. Paul & Ross stop, near the Dallas Museum of Art, until you spot a trolley trundling down the street. It could be Rosie (1909) or the Green Dragon (1913), Matilda (1925), Petunia (1920) or Betty (1926.) Watch out for cars when you step off the curb-some drivers are either careless or naughty. An attendant will help you, anyway. The ride is free of charge but a donation is appreciated because the McKinney Avenue Transit Authority is a nonprofit organization.

The motorman will greet you warmly. If there are small children with you or if you are a child at heart, he will let you step on the horn pedal. What fun! You sit on a hard-backed wooden bench and away you go, clickety-clack, clickety-clack.

Motorman and attendant
Motorman and attendant

You ride along McKinney Avenue, past bars and restaurants and chic boutiques, all the way to the M-line Uptown Station, where the trolley is turned around on the turntable. You have enough time to stretch your legs and snap photos of your trolley. Some passengers alight, some board and the trolley starts again. You might decide to get off at the West Village and take a stroll, do a little window-shopping, or actual shopping, soak up the ritzy atmosphere, and maybe have a cocktail. You hop onto the next trolley back to where you started.

Turning round at Uptown Station
Turning round at Uptown Station

You can hop on and off at any of the stops, should you decide to do a little exploring. Do you feel like an elegant French meal? Step off at stop 9 and walk a few yards to the Saint-Germain Hotel. Are you in the mood for art and culture? The St. Paul & Ross stop is right next to the Dallas Museum of Art and round the corner from the Nasher Sculpture Center. The gardens at the Nasher are, in my opinion, the most beautiful in Dallas. Would you like to enjoy some peace and quiet? Head to Klyde Warren Park, an oasis in the middle of a busy city. If you are into local history, go to Greenwood Cemetery, where prominent citizens and veterans are buried.

Klyde Warren Park on a sunny day
Klyde Warren Park on a sunny day

 

 

Hours of operation
Monday: Thursday 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Friday: 7a.m. to midnight
Saturday: 10 a.m. to midnight
Sunday and holidays: 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Go to www.matag.org for information about stops

Cycling in Dallas

Helmet. Bottle of water.  Padded shorts. Gloves. Brightly coloured clothes. We´re ready to hit the road and cycle around our Dallas suburb.

Ready to set out.
Ready to set out.

We have two options: to use dedicated trails or use the on-street bicycle routes designated by the City of Plano. If we decide to use the trails around, say, Whiterock Lake, we have to loadour bikes onto the truck and drive across the city. It is more practical for us to cycle along the street.

A brave, lone cyclist
A brave, lone cyclist

I prefer to go cycling early at the weekend because there are not as many cars on the road. Although the rules state that a bicycle is entitled to the whole lane on designated routes, I don’t really trust drivers. I see so many of them getting distracted while driving becausen they are talking on the phone or texting or even applying makeup. The fewer cars around me, the better.

The weather has a say in what we do, in a manner of speaking. During the summer it gets so hot that I prefer to hit the road at around 8 o’clock but my husband doesn’t always agree. He doesn’t like to have a strict timetable at weekends and I can understan that. But still, it gets hot!

Which way?
Which way?

It can get very cold in the winter and it’s no fun to cycle with almost freezing wind in your face. The wind blows all year round in Dallas and in all directions at the same time. If we c ycle in one direction against the wind, you’d think you’d have the wind in your back when you cycle in the opposite direction but no, never. The worst is when you’re going downhill and have to pedal hard anyway instead of coasting because the winds stops you. It is very tiring but I’m always glad I’ve done it. I feel great and full of energy.

So go cycling if you can and remeber to wear a helmet, hydrate and stretch afterwards.  Why not even make it a New Year’s resolution?

Christmas madness in Plano, Texas

Every year, the residents of Deerfield (Plano, Texas) go over the top with their Christmas decorations. Some do it themselves, some hire  a business to do it for them and some even go the extent of hiring a designer to do the mise-en-scène.

Visitors can vote for their favourite house by sending a text message with the address to a specific number. Traffic can get heavy in this quiet neighbourhood at weekends. I can only imagine how annoyed residents must feel getting in and out of their garages while trying to avoid gawkers.  There are organized tours of the neighbourhood!

Without further ado, let me show you some of the most outrageous Christmas lights.

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Would you vote for this one?
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A giant manger
Minnie and Mickey went round and round in those teacups
Minnie and Mickey went round and round in those teacups

 

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I love how the shadows of the menorah on the wall behind
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Angels and renindeers and lights, lots of lights
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Walt Disney characters are a staple

These homeowners hired a designer to do the work. I had to video the whole thing because it was impossible to fit all that in one shot!

Which one is your favourite?

George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum [Dallas]

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I’ve always wondered what a Presidential Library is and how it works. We have one here in Dallas, the George W Bush Presidential Library and Museum at the Southern Methodist University campus. The Library was officially opened in May, 2013. Why SMU? Because the university outbid other local universities, such as Baylor or Texas A&M, with its proposal.

I learned that a Presidential Library is an archive and museum at the same time, which preserves the written record and history of US presidents; that is, documents and artifacts written, received and owned by the presidents. They also organize special exhibits. Presidential Libraries are privately funded – and probably looking out for donations on a regular basis -, although they are managed by the National Archives and Records Administration.

Gifts from African nations
Gifts from African nations

SMU campus is very easy to get to, both by car and public transport. I drove and paid the 7 dollar parking fee. I had to go through security: a bag scanner and a metal detector. I was wearing a studded belt, which I was politely asked to remove, otherwise the metal detector would have gone bonkers. The entrance hall is light and airy, with lots of natural light. I paid my 17 dollar entrance fee and started my visit.
Along the walls of the circular hall are the gifts that President Bush, his wife or even Condoleezza Rice received during both his presidencies. Those presents belong to the American people and were divided geographically by continent. There were some amazing pieces of jewellery that I would have been loath to give up.

The collection is divided into themed exhibits that sum up the issues and events of his administration, such as the war against terror, 9/11, programs like No Child Left Behind or my absolutely favourite, a full-size reproduction of the Oval Office.

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The Oval Office put me in mind of Frank Underwood from House of Cards, actually.
View from the Oval Office. It doesn't get any more Dallas than this.
View from the Oval Office. It doesn’t get any more Dallas than this.

I must admit that the main draw for me was the special exhibition devoted to Oscar de la Renta, Five Decades of Style. Laura Bush wore his designs on many occasions, as well as other First Ladies like Nancy Reagan and Hillary Clinton, not to mention Hollywood stars. The gowns and suits were divided into themes: the gardens that influenced his style, Spanish art and culture (he lived in Madrid), red carpet, day wear, his first designs.

Oscar, my friend, I adore your designs!
Oscar, my friend, I adore your designs!

I was looking at what probably was my favourite dress when a security guard walked up to me. He greeted me and said “I just want you to enjoy yourself. Take your time, enjoy yourself.” I told him that I was. He then proceeded to give me fashion advice. A surreal but thoroughly enjoyable experience.

The other object that caught my attention was a length of twisted iron I beams from the Twin Towers. As I was inspecting them closely, a security guard told me I could touch them if I wanted to. I did. She then said that it is believed they came from a place close to the point of impact because of the way they’re twisted. Unless you’ve been there, nothing can bring home to you the real dimension of such awful tragedy. Touching the beams brought me fractionally closer to understanding it – but not quite.

The I beams from the WTC
The I beams from the WTC

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Go here to see more photos: Post by Ana Travels.

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